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: Posts on “Workforce”

Women Outnumber Men in Workforce: An Obvious Cause for More Whininess

Maybe history textbooks should remind people the working conditions that many men have had to go through to provide for wife and children

Maybe history textbooks should remind people the working conditions that many men have had to go through to provide for wife and children

Since I’ve been accused of being whiny about men’s issues, I thought I should bring up a recent article – “In a shrinking workforce women outnumber men: Historic milestone as more women than men employed in Canada in first 6 months of this year.” Cause for celebration? No, not exactly:

1. Margaret Gates, 55, who works in information technology for Enbridge, is buoyed by the increasing numbers of women in the workforce but realizes employment equity may still be a long way off.

2. The new StatsCan data for women’s employment raise serious questions about how we treat children and families

3. But there’s little in this situation to celebrate.

Not only that. Consider that this article could have been called “Men experience unprecedented job loss: Experts fear rise in suicide, depression” and yet not a single man was interviewed. A man’s worth is still very much tied to his role as provider – a sexist remnant of chivalry – which results in a significant correlation between a man losing his job and a man losing his head (by blowing a hole through it). Yet not a single mention of the adverse effects on men of this situation. So much for balance. All 3 highlighted quotes were from women complaining about how society is still stacked against them and stating arrogant remarks like:

women have always worked more than men, but much of it has been at home and unpaid.

or self-aggrandizing remarks like:

Women are willing to take any job that is offered … As long as you know there is money coming in and you can feed your family.

as though men haven’t historically taken the most wretched and dangerous jobs that cost them in stress, anxiety and the loss of life (visit the closest mine and find out about the rate of male death from collapsing rubble for example), for the sake of providing for their family, jobs that routinely kept them away from that very family, and their source of love.

This ending is just laughable, referring to women not receiving equal working conditions. But men have had and continue to have the worst possible working conditions, working as they do in their traditional fields like construction and manufacturing. Very often when women enter dangerous fields, they demand better conditions, and society – which is far more concerned with the welfare of its women – moves heaven and earth, not to mention the laws of capitalism, for their sake. Men may get the benefits, but they aren’t the motivation, for the improvement of many working conditions.

The entire tone of the article is pathetically and openly self-congratulatory mixed with typical victim whininess all rolled into one. Yes, it’s got it all, except for a balancing point of view from a single male.

John Simpson – Men’s Group The Movie…What Lies in the Hearts of Men (Pendulum Effect Ep6 Available)

I’m really happy to have on the show today John Simpson. John is one of those unique guests that makes it such a pleasure to host the Pendulum Effect. He is an award winning creative film producer with over twenty years experience working in the performing arts.

John’s film productions have been screened at the Montreal International film festivals, the Palm Springs film festival, Sydney Film Fest, World of Woman Festival, Algarve Film Festival and Tropfest 2004.

Early in 2007 he launched TITAN VIEW to bring important Australian films to Australian and international audiences. More information can be found on that venture at www.titanview.com

John got involved recently with the film The Jammed, which explores human trafficking and illegal prostitution, helping to guarantee the film would be seen by a large public audience.

Turning from a film focusing on the lives of a group of women to one involving a group of men, he is the producer and co creator of the powerful new Australian film “Men’s Group” that was released in 2008. The film bears the tagline “All around the world men are gathering in groups to talk. What is going on?

This important film, which we’ll discuss with John shortly, received a plethora of awards, including official selection at 2008 film festivals in warsaw, Rotterdam, Copenhagen, Sydney and Melbourne as well as the winner of the prestigious Digispaa best film award. insidefilm awarded the movie best script, best actor and best film awards. It was the higest Scoring Australian Feature Film at the 2008 Sydney Film Festival (as voted by the audience)

The Herald sun said about this film “group gives a male community a chance to speak”, while infilm.com reported “With an emphasis on interesting characters and heartfelt performances, Men’s Group is a compelling drama that wields an emotional impact very few features this year – or any other year – can match.”

You can learn more about the film at www.mensgroupthemovie.com.

You can get the latest show by:

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Download: mp3 file

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The Myth of Male Power Part 2 with Dr. Warren Farrell – Pendulum Effect Episode 3 Available

The Myth of Male Power, Part 2, with Dr. Warren Farrell

On today’s show we continue a three part interview with Dr. Warren Farrell, men’s movement leader. We’ll focus on fathers rights, the boy crisis, violence against men and women and discrimination in the legal system. First question on the agenda: do children really need their father

Dr. Warren Farrell is roundly regarded as a leading figure in the men’s movement, or better, the gender transition movement. His unique background and expertise give him a perfect vantage point from which to address men’s issues. Dr. Farrell has taught gender issues and psychology at several institutes, including Brooklyn College, Georgetown University, American University and the School of Medicine at the University of California at San Diego.

As a young graduate, Dr. Farrell was a major player in the feminist movement, especially in creating men’s groups across the US, then becoming the only man to be elected three times to the Board of Director of the National Organization for Women in New York City. Farrell was featured in media including the New York Times, the Today Show and the Phil Donahue Show, leading to his authorship of the pro-feminist book The Liberated Man.

As we discuss, in the late 80s, Farrell became increasingly convinced that feminism was rather one sided and that men’s issues were being neglected, leading to deep research on a variety of topics long taken for granted, and the publication of his landmark The Myth of Male Power, which touched on a diverse cross section of issues.

Farrell would go on to research each area in great depth, leading to the publication of 5 more books, including “Women Can’t Hear What Men Don’t Say”, a couples communication book to address the rise in divorces, “Father and Child Reunion”, to address the issue of fatherless homes and present the optimal shared parenting solution, “Why Men Earn More” to address the pay gap, and “Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men” which, among other things, called for men’s studies in academia.

You can get the latest show by:

* Subscribing here for free with itunes
* Using this feedburner link in your browser.

Download: mp3 file

If you like the show, please leave us a review on itunes.

Links of Interest

Learn about Dr. Warren Farrell and order his books

The Myth of Male Power, with Dr. Warren Farrell – Pendulum Effect Episode 2 Available

The Myth of Male Power, Part 1, with Dr. Warren Farrell

On today’s show I begin a three part interview with Dr. Warren Farrell mens’ movement leader. Before that, our regular news commentator and pundit Mark defends Denis Prager’s take on the politics of sex in marriage.

My conversation with Dr. Warren Farrell ended up being so engrossing that in order to cover all the topics we wished to explore we decided to go long. The discussion will be released in three parts, on today’s episode 2, episode 3 on January 30 and as one of two interview segments on episode 4. I hope you enjoy them all.

Dr. Warren Farrell is roundly regarded as a leading figure in the men’s movement, or better, the gender transition movement. His unique background and expertise give him a perfect vantage point from which to address men’s issues. Dr. Farrell has taught gender issues and psychology at several institutes, including Brooklyn College, Georgetown University, American University and the School of Medicine at the University of California at San Diego.

As a young graduate, Dr. Farrell was a major player in the feminist movement, especially in creating men’s groups across the US, then becoming the only man to be elected three times to the Board of Director of the National Organization for Women in New York City. Farrell was featured in media including the New York Times, the Today Show and the Phil Donahue Show, leading to his authorship of the pro-feminist book The Liberated Man.

As we discuss, in the late 80s, Farrell became increasingly convinced that feminism was rather one sided and that men’s issues were being neglected, leading to deep research on a variety of topics long taken for granted, and the publication of his landmark The Myth of Male Power, which touched on a diverse cross section of issues.

Farrell would go on to research each area in great depth, leading to the publication of 5 more books, including “Women Can’t Hear What Men Don’t Say”, a couples communication book to address the rise in divorces, “Father and Child Reunion”, to address the issue of fatherless homes and present the optimal shared parenting solution, “Why Men Earn More” to address the pay gap, and “Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men” which, among other things, called for men’s studies in academia.

However, I think at this early stage in the production of the Pendulum Effect, since many of our listeners, perhaps being in a similar position to Dr. Farrell prior to his conversion, shall we say, to a more balanced perspective on gender, might appreciate a sort of broad primer to get a feel for the nature of the issues. I’ve therefore asked Dr. Farrell on the show today to speak on his groundbreaking book The Myth of Male Power.

You can get the latest show by:

* Subscribing here for free with itunes
* Using this feedburner link in your browser.

Download: mp3 file

If you like the show, please leave us a review on itunes.

Links of Interest

Learn about Dr. Warren Farrell and order his books

Real Gender Discrimination: Job Pay Gap or Career Fulfillment Gap? Part 1

It’s high time the science and statistics behind the supposed gender pay gap were re-examined objectively, rather then simply assuming the data fit preconceived dogma. Pseudoscience and grandiose generalizations without the smallest attempt at evidentiary support can crop up in many areas, not only in religion, alternative medicine and claims of the paranormal. Wherever it does it ought to be dealt with critically and swiftly.

I’m talking about the sort of claims made by the likes of the Ontario’s Equal Pay Coalition and its Chair Mary Cornish. In an editorial from just a few months ago, Cornish writes

for every dollar a male employee earns, a woman takes home a measly 71 cents…female high school graduates earn 27 per cent less than male graduates. Female university graduates earn 16 per cent less than male graduates.

As generally happens, these statics treat working men and working women as two separate but homogenous groups, steamrolling over the specific job characteristics and actual work duties of individual people. Cornish showers praise on the Pay Equity Act which:

required employers to evaluate, without bias, jobs done mainly by women and men and to pay equal wages and benefits for comparable worth.

Well that makes sense, right? Except who decides what work is to be considered equal worth? Let’s dig a little deeper and move from the Editorial to the website of the Equal Pay Coalition, where we read

The [Pay Equity] Act requires employers to take positive steps to pay “women’s work” on the same basis as “men’s work.” The legislation has had a very visible effect: Ontario’s wage gap between male and female full-time annual earnings has narrowed significantly since 1987 when the Ontario government first passed a proactive pay equity law.

So much for treating men and women as individuals. Instead, female workers are lumped into a “women’s work” category while male workers are lumped into a “men’s work” category. The goal is then to throw economics to the wind and socially engineer pay rates in whatever fashion can have the math works out at the end of the day with the average employee performing “women’s work” making the same as one performing “men’s work.”

But as we’ll explore in the upcoming parts of this post series, workers make conscientious choices to trade in power, satisfaction, fulfillment and family for higher salaries. The result is that females – choosing lower paying jobs on average – have been shown to display a much higher level of overall career and life satisfaction by several different metrics.

167 offshore workers - all men - died in the Piper Alpha tragedy on July 6 1988 due to a gas leak

Here is Job Economics 101. What do the following jobs have in common? Jobs that no one wants (think garbage men), that are most likely to kill you (think police men, fire men, cab drivers and those working oil riggers), that have high anxiety (think corporate lawyers), that expose you to the elements (think delivery men), that involve unpleasant environments (think security guards), that are risky (think venture capitalists) and that take you routinely away from the people you love (think fishermen). 1. These jobs generally pay higher, even if they otherwise involve similar skills and education to lower paying jobs, and 2. These jobs generally have “men” in the title and are overwhelmingly “dominated” by men.

As we’ll see, most statistics supporting the pay gap fail to control for any of these factors, usually averaging all employees in broad industries like “professional occupations in health” or “teachers and professors” or my favourite “judges, lawyers, psychologists, social workers, ministers of religion, and policy and program affiliates” and never getting more specific then “dentists” (general dentist, pediatric dentist, endodontist or prosthodontist?) or “university professor” (assistant, associate, full, tenured, cross-appointed, department head, or emeritus?)

After the posts are done in this short series, we’ll conclude with a very basic point: if controlled for all the same conditions women and men are making less there is a problem to be addressed. But if we’re re-engineering our economy so that the average woman can have her cake and eat it to that would be truly sexist.

We’ll discuss the statistics and sources on the gender pay gap but also on the rarely considered job satisfaction gap in the coming days. Meanwhile, chew over the above while watching a great video of Warren Farrell, author of The Myth of Male Power and Why Men Earn More, lecturing on the latter book and learn why, as Farrell so eloquently puts it: “getting higher pay meant giving up power for men.

(the full 8 parts can be found starting here http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=Cb_6v-JQ13Q)

 

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