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MEN STATS COUNTDOWN

This document has been kindly provided by Daryl Reimer, counsellor for men and families.

This information has been gathered to point out the significance of men’s issues.  Statistical comparisons with women are presented only as a reference. This document is not intended to minimize women’s needs or any issues that unfairly affect women. Please use this information to support men but not in a way that undermines women.

TEN

  • 10/10 – almost everyone who is killed on the job in Canada is a man. In 2005, 1064 men died at work, compared to 33 women.  Workplace fatalities have been rising steadily since 1990 [1]
  • 10/10 – almost all child support orders are made against men. In the provinces that share data, 96% of child support orders are against men. [2]
  • 10/10 – 97.6 % of Canadian Combat Soldiers are men. [3] In 2007, Canada had 2333 soldiers under 18 years of age. [4]
  • Men are 10 times more likely than women to have children leave their home after a divorce. [5]
  • Men are 10% more likely than women to have a new diagnosis of cancer [6]
  • Men are 10 % less likely than women to eat fruits and vegetables [7]


NINE

  • 9 out of 10 people accused of homicide in Canada are Men [8]
  • Men are 9% less likely than women to make changes to improve their health [9]


EIGHT

  • Men are 8% less likely to have a family doctor than women [10]
  • 8 out of 10 homeless people are men [11]

 

SEVEN

  • 7 out of 10 men in prison were predeceased by their mothers before they were 25 years old [12]
  • 7 out of 10 homicide victims are men [13]
  • Of prisoners who experienced childhood abuse, 7 out of 10 were abused before age 5[14]
  • Young men complete high school 7% less than young women [15]
  • The ratio of men who were employed decreased by 7% between 1976 and 2009. In the same period, there was a 16% increase in the ratio of women who were employed[16]
  • 7% of workers receiving EI parental benefits are men [17]
  • 7 out of 10 (70%) workers receiving other EI benefits are men [18]
  • 7% of men diagnosed with depression will kill themselves. Among depressed women, it’s 1% [19]

 

SIX

  • Among all men, 1 in 6 will report experiencing childhood sexual abuse  [20]
  • 1 of 6 men with documented history of childhood sexual abuse will acknowledge the sexual abuse. 4 of 6 women will report documented sexual abuse [21]
  • Divorced men are 6 times more likely to experience depression than other men [22]
  • Men are 6% less likely to ask a professional for help when they experience depression[23]
  • Men are 6% more likely to be unrepresented in divorce proceedings [24]


FIVE

  • Men’s life expectancy is 5 years less than women. In 1976, the gap was more than 7 years.  In 1921, the gap was less than 2 years [25]
  • 5 % of all sole custody orders in family court are made to fathers. 77% of sole custody orders are made to mothers. [26]
  • 1 in 5 Canadian children, or about 2 million in total, live without their father [27]


FOUR

  • Men work an average of 4 hours per week more at their full time jobs than women employed full time [28]
  • On average, men spend 4 hours a week more than women travelling to their full time jobs [29]


THREE

  • Men are over 3 times more likely to die by suicide than women [30]
  • Women are 3 times more likely to report domestic violence to police [31]
  • Women are 3 times more likely to obtain a protection order after domestic violence [32]
  • Men are 3 times more likely to say domestic violence did not affect them much [33]
  • Men are 3 times as likely to have a new diagnosis of HIV [34]
  • Men of working age are 3% less likely than working women to have a university degree. For younger workers, the difference is 8% [35]


TWO

  • Men are 2 times more likely than women to lose social support after separation or divorce [36]
  • Men are 2 times more likely than women to experience depression after divorce [37]
  • Men are more than 2 times more likely to drink heavily than women (25% vs 10%) [38]
  • Women are 2 times as likely to report an injury from domestic violence [39]
  • Averaged over a year, men lose twice as much to gambling than women [40]

 

ONE

  • The ratio of domestic assaults between men and women is 1 to 1 [41]
  • Men’s real wages increased by 1.8% between 1988 and 2008. In the same period, women’s wages increased 11.6 % [42]


HALF

  • Half as many men seek professional help for mental health problems, compared to women [43]
  • Men are half as likely to be diagnosed with depression compared to women. [44]
  • Men report incidents of spousal violence about half as often as women [45]
  • Half of male prisoners in Canada report some form of childhood abuse. Of those who report, 75% say it started before age five [46]


MORE

  • The unemployment rate has been higher for men than for women every year since 1989 [47]
  • Men are more likely than women to do things that are a sign of high stress (drinking, smoking, become overweight, multiple sex partners, poor diet) [48]
  • Men are 22% more likely than women to be diagnosed with diabetes [49]
  • Men under 60 years of age are 15-20% more likely than women to be obese [50]
  • Men are more likely to be formally charged by police when a complaint is made [51]
  • Men are 7% more likely to be charged with multiple crimes in an incident [52]
  • Men’s charges are more likely to be pursued in court (28% of cases withdrawn, compared to 37% for women) [53]
  • Men are 11% more likely to be found guilty in court [54]
  • When they are found guilty, men are 9% more likely to be sentenced to prison than women [55]
  • For most crimes, men are sentenced to significantly longer prison sentences than women [56]


LESS

  • Men are 2.5% less likely to have unionized work than women. From 1976 to 2009, unionization rates fell 20% for men and rose 10% for women [57]
  • Men are less likely to keep their job in a recession. In 2009, the employment rate fell 3% for men and 1% for women [58]
  • Men are slightly less likely than women to enroll in university, and even less likely to complete a degree [59]
  • Men are 23% less likely to seek out a regular doctor than women [60]
  • Police are 14% less likely to lay charges when the victim of domestic violence is a man [61]
  • Men are killed by their intimate partners about 1/3 as often as women [62]
  • Men are likely to report less severe forms of spousal violence to police than women [63]

 

SOURCES

[1] Sharpe, A. & Hardt, J. (2006). Five Deaths a Day: Workplace Fatalities in Canada,1993-2005. Centre for the study of living standards, Ottawa: Canada.  Data collected by the Association of Workers Compensation Boards of Canada.

[2] Statistics Canada. Interjurisdictional cases of spousal and child support, 2010/2011. Updated: March 28, 2012. Online: www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11628-eng.htm#a1

[3] Government of Canada, National Defense and the Canadian Armed Forces. Online: www.forces.gc.ca/en/news/article.page?doc=women-in-the-canadian-armed-forces/hie8w7rm

[4] Global Report 2008, Child Soldiers International.  Online: www.child-soldiers.org/global_report_reader.php?id=97

[5] Rotermann, M.  Marital breakdown and subsequent depression. Health Reports, Vol. 18, No. 2, May 2007 Statistics Canada, Catalogue 82-003

[6] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[7] Based on eating 5 or more portions per day, (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[8] This is an estimate based on a conversation between a student at Men’s Resource Centre of Manitoba and staff at The Salvation Army in Winnipeg in June, 2012.

[9] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[10] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[11] Estimated by Winnipeg shelter worker in phone conversation June, 2012.

[12] Correctional Service Canada.  (2012).  The incidence of family violence perpetrated by federal offenders: A file review.  www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/pblct/fv/fv03/fv03e07-eng.shtml

[13] Statistics Canada (2012).  Adult correctional statistics in Canada, 2010-2011.  Online:  www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/legal10a-eng.htm)

[14] Correctional Service Canada.  (2012).  The incidence of family violence perpetrated by federal offenders: A file review.  www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/pblct/fv/fv03/fv03e07-eng.shtml

[15] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[16] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[17] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[18] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[19] American Association of Suicidology. Depression and Suicide. Based on 2010 Data.  URL http://www.suicidology.org/resources/facts-statistics-current-research Accessed March 14, 2014

[20] Goodwin, R. (2013). What we know about the sexual abuse of boys. One in Six:  Ottawa, Canada.  Online information accessed March 14, 2014. URL www.1in6.ca/articles/what-we-know-about-the-sexual-abuse-of-boys/

[21] Goodwin, R. (2013). What we know about the sexual abuse of boys. One in Six:  Ottawa, Canada.  Online information accessed March 14, 2014. URL www.1in6.ca/articles/what-we-know-about-the-sexual-abuse-of-boys/

[22] Rotermann, M.  Marital breakdown and subsequent depression. Health Reports, Vol. 18, No. 2, May 2007 Statistics Canada, Catalogue 82-003

[23] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[24] Mcmullen, & Oswald, (2010) Why do we need a lawyer: an Empirical study of divorce cases. Family studies, 57.

[25] Statistics Canada. Healthy People, Healthy Places Catalogue 82-229-XWE Ottawa: 2010.

[26] Canada: Department of Justice. Sharing Custody- When Parents Separate: Further Findings from the Natioanl Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (2004-FCY-6E). Updated: Dec 5, 2011. [http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/fcy-fea/lib-bib/rep-rap/2005/2004_6/p3.html].

[27] Canada: Department of Justice. Overview and Assessment to Approaches to Access Enforcement. Updated: Dec 5, 2011. [http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/fcy-fea/lib-bib/rep-rap/2001/2001_8/can4.html#N_104].

[28] Statistics Canada. Perspectives on Labour and Income. Why  has the gender wage gap narrowed? Drolet, M. Ottawa: Canada.  This fact has typically been unreported and not statistically factored into the gender wage gap that suggests women earn about 70 cents for every dollar that men earn for the same “full time” work.  The gender wage gap also overlooks the far greater risk of injury and death present in many workplaces dominated by men.

[29] Statistics Canada. Perspectives on Labour and Income. Why  has the gender wage gap narrowed? Drolet, M. Ottawa: Canada. This fact has typically been unreported and not statistically factored into the gender wage gap that suggests women earn about 70 cents for every dollar that men earn for the same “full time” work.  The gender wage gap also overlooks the far greater risk of injury and death present in many workplaces dominated by men.

[30] Statistics Canada. Health at a Glance,.  Catalogue 82-624-X Ottawa: 2010 Suicide Rates: An Overview by Tanya Navaneelan

[31] Statistics Canada (2012).  Highlights:  Family Violence in Canada – A statistical profile. Online: www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11643/hl-fs-eng.htm

[32] Statistics Canada (2012).  Highlights:  Family Violence in Canada – A statistical profile. Online: www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11643/hl-fs-eng.htm

[33] Statistics Canada (2012).  Highlights:  Family Violence in Canada – A statistical profile. Online: www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11643/hl-fs-eng.htm

[34] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[35] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[36] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[37] Rotermann, M.  Marital breakdown and subsequent depression. Health Reports, Vol. 18, No. 2, May 2007 Statistics Canada, Catalogue 82-003

[38] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[39] Statistics Canada (2012).  Highlights:  Family Violence in Canada – A statistical profile. Online: www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11643/hl-fs-eng.htm

[40] Statistics Canada (2011).  Gambling 2011.  Online: www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2011004/article/11551-eng.htm

[41] Statistics Canada (2012).  Highlights:  Family Violence in Canada – A statistical profile. Online: www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11643/hl-fs-eng.htm

[42] Statistics Canada. Perspectives on Labour and Income. Why  has the gender wage gap narrowed? Drolet, M. Ottawa: 2011 This fact has typically been unreported and not statistically factored into the gender wage gap that suggests women earn about 70 cents for every dollar that men earn for the same “full time” work.  The gender wage gap also overlooks the far greater risk of injury and death present in many workplaces dominated by men.

[43] American Association of Suicidology. Help-seeking among Men: Implications for Suicide Prevention.  URL www.suicidology.org/c/document_library/get_file?folderId=254&name=DLFE-439.pdf Accessed March 14, 2014

[44] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[45] Statistics Canada. Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2010. by Maire Sinha Component of Statistics Canada catalogue no. 85-002-X Ottawa: 2012 This data is gathered through police reports and criminal justice system information.

[46] Correctional Service Canada.  (2012).  The incidence of family violence perpetrated by federal offenders: A file review.  www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/pblct/fv/fv03/fv03e07-eng.shtml

[47] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[48] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[49] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[50] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report.  Interestingly, the relationship between obesity and income is opposite for men and women.  Higher income men are more likely to be obese, while lower income women are more likely to be obese.

[51] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[52] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[53] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[54] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[55] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[56] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[57] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[58] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[59] Statistics Canada. Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X Ottawa: 2011

[60] (2011) Turcotte, M. Women and Health, Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-503-X  Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report

[61] Statistics Canada. Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2010. by Maire Sinha Component of Statistics Canada catalogue no. 85-002-X Ottawa: 2012 This data is gathered through police reports and criminal justice system information.

[62] Statistics Canada. Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2010. by Maire Sinha Component of Statistics Canada catalogue no. 85-002-X Ottawa: 2012 This data is gathered through police reports and criminal justice system information.

[63] Statistics Canada. Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2010. by Maire Sinha Component of Statistics Canada catalogue no. 85-002-X Ottawa: 2012 This data is gathered through police reports and criminal justice system information.

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